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Cameras Lenses

Canon EF Lenses on Nikon Z mount cameras

If you are a Nikon Z shooter, and are looking to to expand your lens options beyond the small-ish selection of Nikon Z mount lenses and the large selection of Nikon F mount lenses, you have options.

Enter the TechArt TZC-01, a lens adapter that will allow you to use your Canon EF mount glass on your Nikon Z camera. TechArt also makes a version that will allow Sony E mount lenses to work on the Z mount as well, but for this review, I’m focusing on the Canon EF version.

The adapter is about what you’d expect from a lens mount adapter. It’s roughly the same size as the Nikon FTZ adapter, albeit without the tripod mount attachment that the FTZ features.

The adapter is built solidly, featuring a brass mounting ring, metal construction, and 1.45 oz / 41.0 g weight. If you are used to shooting with the FTZ, this won’t feel much different.

An unexpectedly nice feature of the TechArt TZC-01 is the lens dock, which is really just the lens cap. It features metal contacts to interface with the adapter, and a Micro-USB port, allowing you to deliver firmware updates to the adapter as they become available. How useful this feature is will ultimately rest with the manufacturer, and if they ever decide to issue a firmware update. But, it’s good to know that if Nikon ever issued a firmware update that rendered the TZC-01 inoperative, TechArt might be able to push their own firmware update out that would restore compatibility.

I jumped off the Canon system years ago, so I didn’t have many lenses to test against. My sole Canon EF lens I’ve retained – the Canon 50mm f1.8 STM II lens – aka the ‘nifty-fifty’, was the first test subject. Autofocus was quick, and all the standard auto focus options that are available to native Z mount lenses – Eye/Face autofocus and Animal AF – new to the Z with firmware 3.0 – worked great.

I rented the Canon EF 100mm f2.8 L lens for testing as well from Aperturent. Being a macro lens, this is not a super fast focusing lens even when used on a native EF mount body. That said, the lens performed admirably on both the Nikon Z6 and Z7.

Using the adapter, the camera will pick up limited EXIF data from the lens. You will get the maximum F stop and the focal length, but not the lens brand name. For instance, the Canon EF 100mm f2.8 L lens identifies only as ‘100mm f2.8’. This isn’t a dealbreaker, as I noticed when I was testing out the Sigma 70-200 f2.8 Sport lens on the Nikon Z cameras with the FTZ adapter, it too didn’t report the brand name of the lens.

At $249.00, I’ll leave it to you to decide if the price is worth the benefit. I suspect if you love your Nikon Z cameras, and have access to a good selection of Canon EF mount glass, the price of admission is worth it.

There are some quality Canon EF lenses that don’t have a Nikon Z (or let alone a Nikon F) equivalent. The Canon EF 50mm 1.2 and Canon 85mm f1.2 come to mind. Both of those lenses are beasts and have some great optical characteristics (namely, the insane bokeh both feature). However, neither were autofocus speed demons when mounted on the Canon 5D IV, so I wouldn’t expect them to be any better mounted on the Nikon Z cameras. Still, until Nikon ships the 50mm. 1.2 S lens sometime this year, it’s an option.

If you are a Canon EF shooter moving over to the Nikon Z ecosystem, this adapter could be indispensable as you slowly convert you glass to native Z mount offerings, as they become available over the next few years.

TechArt Canon EF to Nikon Z Mount Adapter – Amazon Affiliate Link

Canon 50mm f1.8 STM II – Amazon Affiliate Link

Nikon Z6 with 24-70 f4 S lens – Amazon Affiliate Link

Aperturent – Photo/Video/Lens rentals – Amazon Affiliate Link

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