Categories
Apple Computers

WWDC 2021: No new hardware

All the rumors pointed to new M1X MacBook Pros being released today at WWDC, but it did not come to pass. Perhaps the global chop shortage is to blame. Or maybe it’s the constrained availability of the mini LED displays expected to be used in the 14″ version. Whatever the reason, we will have to keep waiting for new professional M1 powered Mac laptops.

Hopefully Apple drops these before July. I have a kid heading off to college in August, and I was hoping to send her with my current work machine, the M1 MacBook Air, while I moved up to the 14″ MacBook Pro. But I’m kind of torn about it, as the M1 MacBook Air I have been using as my main work computer is working quite well now that Docker and Homebrew are M1 native. There have been a few quirks to work through (mostly related to NodeJS and the lack of an M1 native version for any Node version earlier than 15), but overall, it’s been a lightweight very capable dev machine. If they offered a version with 32GB of RAM and a few more USB-C ports, I’d probably not even need the 14″ MacBook Pro.

Here’s hoping to an Apple event in July.

Categories
Apple Politics Social Media

Apple, Google, Amazon and Parler

Big Tech creates rules of the road, and applies them inconsistently.

So, unless you’ve been living under a rock for the last 3 weeks or so (and if you have, I really envy you), you are probably aware of the Capital riots and the aftermath that saw Apple and Google both boot Parler from their App Stores, and then a few days later, Amazon giving Parler 24 hours to find new hosting before they kicked them off of AWS.

Now, whatever your thoughts are on Parler, you should be concerned about this concerted effort by the titans of tech to remove an upstart social media platform simply because of it’s political slant.

Google removed Parler from it’s Play Store with nary a reason. Apple at least tried to feign impartiality by giving Parler time to outline a plan it could implement that would tackle it’s “moderation problem”. Parler’s response to Apple’s query was that it would improve it’s tools to allow for ‘self policing’, meaning it would rely on other users to report bad behavior. Apple didn’t like that answer, and booted Parler from the App Store, with the condition that they could be re-instated if they improved their moderation practices.

Amazon didn’t give Parler any such “consideration”, and instead just gave Parler 24 hours notice before it deactivated their AWS account.

The rub here is that Twitter uses AWS as it’s backend. And Twitter, by distinction of being a larger platform, was used far more than Parler for any violence that was incited at the Capital and many other riots that have taken place over the last year. Hell, you could argue that violent idea domestic terrorists Antifa have used Twitter for organization and incitement of violence for four years. As if to make the point as clearly as it could be made, the same day that Parler was being booted from AWS for “incitement to violence” and lack of moderation, the phrase #HangPence was being promoted and trending on Twitter.

Yet Twitter remains an AWS customer, and is still available for download in both Google and Apple App Stores.

Tech has long told conservatives that if they don’t like the rules of the liberal platforms like Facebook, Instagram, Twitter et all, that they should go and build their own platforms.

With Parler, they did just that. Parler was a hot mess of UI and app issues, and it’s infrastructure was constantly falling over. But in spite of that, it was growing like gang busters. It was the #1 app in the Apple App Store for many months, right up until Apple booted it. Conservatives had built their own social media platform, and at the first opportunity, Google, Apple and Amazon got their guns out and shot it right in the head.

Amazon’s move is the most egregious, because without the breadth and scale of AWS, it’s hard for any up and coming social media platform to compete with the likes of Twitter. Twitter has used AWS to handle their scalability and infrastructure problems as it moved from a desktop micro blogging platform to a tool on millions of peoples phones. That Amazon took out a competitor to Twitter for purporting to incite violence, when Twitter has been used to incite violence since it’s very inception and continues to be used still, reeks of collusion. At the very least it is a demonstrable case of a company unequally applying a set of rules to two different companies.

Parler has launched a lawsuit against Amazon, and I feel they have a good shot at winning it. In the interim, Parler is working to restore it’s service, though with the bad press garnered from the shunning by Amazon, Apple and Google, they will find it hard to find a new infrastructure provider who can give them what Amazon did. Building out your own infrastructure at this scale is difficult and costly, and extremely risky when you have the titans of tech gunning for you and able to cut you off at the knees at every chance they get.

The time for Big Tech to be regulated has passed. It’s not just the repeal of Section 230 that is needed. New restrictions on these companies that hold immense power need to be enacted. Sadly, with the Biden administration in power, these companies will be publicly chided, and privately courted by those with the power. The best free speech advocates (and those persecuted by Big Tech) can hope for is wins in the courts that will make it harder for these companies to hide behind the mantra that they are “platforms and not publishers”.

Until then, expect freedom of speech online to continue to be attacked and driven to extinction.

Categories
Apple Software Videography

Final Cut Pro X 10.5.1 – what kind of bullshit is this?

I use Final Cut Pro X for all my videos. I love the feature set, and I’ve been happy with the way that Apple has constantly updated it since it’s release 9 years ago and haven’t charged any users for upgrades in that time.

That said, the latest update released – 10.5.1, features a major downgrade.

Prior to this release, you could export and upload your video in one step thru the sharing feature to YouTube. This made it extremely convenient to render and upload, and set your title, keywords and description all from within the Final Cut Pro X export dialog.

With 10.5.1, Apple has replaced this with a “YouTube and Facebook” option, which just exports the video to your disk at the “recommended” export settings for those services. This is a huge step back and takes what was a once step process before, and turns it in to a multi step process.

Now, I have to export the video. Then I have to login to YouTube, navigate to the Creator portal, click Upload Video, and then find the video on my filesystem and drag it to the browser. The main thing that’s annoying is that during this upload, I feel the need not to do any serious browsing, because if I somehow cause the browser to be unstable, and it crashes, I have to start the entire upload over again.

I’m sure Apple took this route because keeping compatibility with YouTube’s upload API was resource consuming. But it was a major friction point that Apple had turned in to a simple one step process.

I really hope they listen to their users and roll this feature back to how it was.

Categories
Apple Computers Software

How to tell if an application is Apple Silicon native

If you are using one of the new M1 Apple Silicon Macs, you may be wondering how to tell if an app you have is optimized for Apple Silicon. There are a couple of ways to deduce this.

  1. Get Info: The first option is to use the “Get Info” option in the Finder. Navigate to the app’s location (usually in /Applications), click on the app, and the use Command-I. Under the “General” heading will be listing for “Kind:”, with three possible options – Application(Universal), Application(Intel), Application (Apple Silicon). The Intel and Apple Silicon options should be self explanatory. The “Universal” option means that the app is a “fat binary”, containing the code for both Intel and Apple Silicon versions. “Fat Binaries” have more coverage than an app compiled for either architectures, but they are also nearly twice the size of a standard binary.
  2. Activity Monitor: If the app is already running, you can open the Activity Monitor (located in /Applications/Utilities). Here you will see a list of all running applications. In the column labeled ‘Architecture’, you will see either Intel or Apple Silicon listed. Activity Monitor shows you the code that is being executed, so even if the application is a fat binary, it will only show the platform code that is currently being run.
Categories
3D Apple Computers

More benchmarks: Blender – MacBook Air M1 vs. MacBook Pro 16″ i9

A few other comparative benchmarks on the new MacBook Air M1 (16GB/512GB configuration), pitted against a MacBook Pro 16” (i9/64GB/4TB/Radeon 5500M-8GB).

Blender (running in Rosetta 2 on the M1). Demo files can be found here.

Fishy Cat (1 frame):

  • MacBook Air M1: 1 min 35 sec
  • MacBook Pro i9: 37 sec

Mr. Elephant (1 frame):

  • MacBook Air M1: 2 min 18 sec
  • MacBook Pro i9: 1 min 13 sec

Racing Car (1 frame):

  • MacBook Air M1: 13 min 22 sec
  • MacBook Pro i9: 8 min 52 sec

Now, of course this is hardly a fair fight. The i9 MacBook Pro has a discrete GPU (in this case, a Radeon Pro 5500M with 8GB). And Blender is being run via Rosetta. But in the wake of the ridiculous walloping all the Intel Macs are receiving by these entry level M1 machines, I thought it’d be nice to share an area where the Intel Macs are still (at least for the moment) worth their money.

Categories
Apple Developers Software

Apple reducing App Store commission fee for small businesses

Apple today announced that they will be reducing the App Store commission rate from 30% to 15% for developers who earn less than $1 million USD from the App Store. This comes as Apple has been under pressure from developers like Epic Games and Spotify, who have called Apple’s 30% commission unfair and anti-competitive.

The reduced fees will apply to both app sales and subscriptions. Once a developer’s sales expand beyond the $1 million USD mark, then all additional sales are subject to the 30% rate.

John Gruber writes in his article:

Let’s say a new developer enters the program (and thus qualifies for the 15 percent commission) and their apps are on pace to generate $1.2M in sales. At 15 percent, $1.2M in revenue would generate $1.02M in earnings — putting them over the threshold, so their entire earnings the next year would face a 30 percent commission. If their sales remain flat the next year, the same $1.2M in revenue would earn them only $840K at 30 percent. They’d have to generate $1.5M in revenue to earn the same profit that $1.2M in sales brought them the year before. Basically, if the end of the year draws near and a developer in the Small Business Program has revenue approaching $1.2M, they’re incentivized to pull their apps or reduce their prices to keep from going over the threshold.

John makes an interesting point. The $300k difference between $1.5M and $1.2M means the difference between being able to pay for an entire developer’s salary for a year. For a small business, it’s a legitimate concern.

And kudos to John for finally figuring out that higher taxes on earnings can disincentivize people and businesses from wanting to produce. Though I’m sure the comparison will be lost on him.

Categories
Apple Computers

Apple Silicon Macs are here, and wow.

Ok, I’ll admit my previous post about the release of Apple Silicon powered Macs gave the impression that there wasn’t much exciting about the CPU switch, but boy, was I wrong.

I’ve had my hands on the M1 powered MacBook Air (with 16GB RAM/512GB SSD) for just a few hours now, and after putting it thru it’s paces, I’m floored.

I’ve run two benchmarks – XcodeBenchmark and Bruce X. These are more akin to real world benchmarks. I’m not knocking Geekbench of Cinebench, but these benchmarks involve actual applications that people will use, and actual projects that simulate what real world performance will look like. And after running each of these, and comparing it against my $4400 MacBook Pro 16″ i9/64GB RAM/4TB SSD machine, I’m floored.

Bruce X Benchmark

  • MacBook Pro i9 2.4ghz/64GB/4TB SSD: 16.03 seconds
  • MacBook Air (M1) – 16GB/512GB SSD: 11.69 seconds

XcodeBenchmark

  • MacBook Pro i9 2.4ghz/64GB/4TB SSD: 223.016 seconds
  • MacBook Air (M1) – 16GB/512GB SSD: 127.713 seconds

Again, these are real world benchmarks using real projects for Xcode and Final Cut Pro. And the MacBook Air doesn’t even have a fan. During the Xcode benchmark, the MacBook Pro’s fans spun up and were quite loud. The MacBook Air was dead silent. Of course, during sustained CPU usage the fan will be a benefit, as it will keep the CPU cooler, whereas with the MacBook Air M1, the CPU will throttle down to prevent the computer from overheating.

Here’s another comparison: I have a Logic Pro X project I’m working on that contains about a twenty tracks – 16 of which are audio tracks, the other 4 are software instruments, and of course, there are various effects applied to all the tracks. This project couldn’t play smoothly without stuttering on my MacBook Air 2020 i5 16/512GB machine. On the M1 MacBook Air, it plays as smooth as butter.

App performance isn’t the whole story though. The entire OS feels much faster. Apps (those that are Apple Silicon enabled) open incredibly fast. I’ve only tried a few apps that weren’t optimized for Apple Silicon, and the results have been great. For example, the original Pixelmator, which I still use for day to day graphics tasks, isn’t optimized for Apple Silicon. It opens quickly, and using it feels just as fast and performant as it does on my i9 MacBook Pro. Every app is different, of course, but Rosetta 2 looks like another incredible feat of engineering from Apple.

On the software development front outside of Xcode, things are a different story. There isn’t much of my everyday work toolchain that is ready for Apple Silicon yet. Stuff like HomeBrew, NodeJS, Docker and other web technologies are not quite ready for Apple’s new chip, and anyone who works with these technologies would be advised to wait before upgrading to the new machines.

But for everyone else – come on in, the water is fine.

The short of this is: If you are using your Mac for Xcode, Final Cut Pro or Logic Pro X, you are going to be blown away at what these Macs with the M1 chip are capable of.

Amazon is currently dropping $50 off the price of the M1 powered MacBook Air and Pro.

Categories
Apple Computers

Apple Silicon Macs are here, and meh.

Some quick takeaways from the Apple event today that heralded the release of the first Apple Silicon Macs.

  • Apple is still including 720p cameras in the Air and the 13″ Pro. In the age of COVID where everyone is doing virtual meetings, this is disappointing. I’m not entirely faulting Apple here, as a 1080p camera that can fit in a thin laptop LCD doesn’t exist yet (as far as I can tell, I haven’t seen one in a laptop display). Apple is claiming that the M1 chip can improve the quality of the picture in sharpness and shadows.
  • Apple is using the M1 chip in the Air, 13″ Pro, and the mini. The low end Air is using a 7-core GPU vs. an 8-core GPU in the higher end air. But apart from that, there’s no differentiation given between the models. This falls in line with Apple trying to keep the specs of it’s hardware as vague as possible. But it makes you wonder if the performance of the higher end Air and the 13″ Pro are going to be comparable. The Air doesn’t have a fan, so it will be constrained thermally compared with the Pro, but for workloads that are not sustained, it should be just as powerful as the Pro. We will see once the real world benchmarks start appearing.
  • All three of these machines max out at 16GB of RAM. The RAM is built in to the CPU itself, which should mean RAM throughput should be quite fast. But it also means no user upgradeable RAM (which allowed people buying a Mac mini to save a good bit of money handling the RAM upgrade themselves). For the Air, topping out at 16GB is fine. For the 13″ Pro, it’s acceptable – this is the low end 13″ Pro, after all, the one with only 2 Thunderbolt ports… the real 13″ Pro (with 4 ports and better RAM upgrade options should come later). For the Mac mini, it’s a letdown. You can configure the last Intel Mac mini with up to 64GB RAM. 16GB just isn’t enough to handle things like opening 100GB Photoshop files, or opening Final Cut Pro projects that are several gigabytes in size. Now, maybe Apple has optimized the architecture of these news to more efficiently page out to the SSD, but for real pros, there is no substitute for having ample RAM. I’m anxiously awaiting to see how well these RAM constrained Macs can perform with large files. We will see.
  • None of these Macs can utilize an external GPU. That’s a bummer.
  • The Mac mini is once again available in Silver, and not Space Gray like the last version. I suspect this might be because Apple is going to have a ‘Mac mini Pro’ available at some point in the future, which would (theoretically) have higher RAM options.
  • With Apple utilizing RAM on the chip, they have buyers over a barrel. Apple can charge whatever they want for a RAM upgrade (and at present they are charing a $200 differential between 8 and 16GB). This isn’t going to sit well with many users (myself included). This makes me very nervous for an Apple Silicon Mac Pro or iMac. These machines are geared towards people who usually demand gobs of RAM, and don’t want to pay Apple exorbitant fees. If these machines don’t have user upgradeable RAM, there’s going to a lot of disgruntled Pro users.
  • All three M1 Macs can drive Apple’s 6K display.
  • The M1 Mac mini features two Thunderbolt 3/USB-4 ports, and 2 USB-A ports. This is a downgrade from the last Intel Mac mini’s 4 Thunderbolt and 2 USB-3 ports. No Thunderbolt 4.
  • All the new Macs feature Wifi 6.
  • I’m surprised the Touch Bar survives on the 13″ Pro. I was convinced Apple would drop it. But it seems it does serve a purpose in differentiating the Air from the 13″ Pro. Even with powering the Touch Bar, the 13″ Pro gets significantly better battery life than the Air. A slightly chunkier chassis goes a long way towards more battery capacity.

Apple Silicon looks like it’s going to be extremely competitive with Intel chips on the low end. Hopefully they can outshine Intel on the high end end as well.

Categories
Apple Smartphones

iPhone 12 Pro Review

The iPhone 4/5/SE form factor makes triumphant return.

A few weeks in to using my iPhone 12 Pro, and the one word that’s sticking out to me that I could use to describe Apple’s iPhone’s is consistency. Each yearly upgrade brings a few small changes. Gone are the days when a new release would contain revolutionary features that made it a must have upgrade. The iPhone 12 Pro packs a few notable upgrades in it’s chassis, but if you are using an iPhone Xs or an 11 Pro, there’s not a lot here that’s in the ‘must have’ territory of an upgrade. But what is here is good, so let’s break it down.

5G (finally) arrives

Apple took it’s sweet time with bringing 5G to the iPhone, and I don’t fault them one bit for being one of the last manufacturers to add 5G to their devices. First off, 5G is a battery drain. And while the 5G modems have gotten better with their power consumption, they still draw more power than the 4G modems. Apple tempers this with the ability to use ‘Smart Data’ mode, where the phone intelligently determines if you are performing a task that would benefit from 5G. If you are, then it turns on 5G. If you aren’t, it turns 5G off. Additionally, you can drop back to 4G all the time or force the phone to use 5G all the time. How much 5G affects your battery performance will entirely come down to your usage, and whether or not you are in a 5G capable cell. But the speed increase with 5G can be significant, so it’s a welcome addition.

iPhone 12 vs the 12 Pro

After viewing this years iPhone offerings, I initial thought I was going to go with the iPhone 12 over the 12 Pro. But after having the Pro for a few days, I returned it and opted for the Pro. However, I think that most people will be better served by the iPhone 12.

First off, the two phones form factors are identical. They both can use the same cases. The key differences between the two models comes down to these points:

  • The iPhone 12 weighs less than the 12 Pro. This is primarily due to the 12 using an Aluminum frame, while the 12 Pro uses a Stainless Steel frame. The 12 Pro is a smidge lighter than the 11 Pro, but overall, I preferred the weight of the 12 over the 12 Pro.
  • The screens on each are the same dimensions and resolution. The 12 Pro however, can handle Dolby Vision HDR playback, and boost to a slightly bright setting.
  • The iPhone 12 Pro gains the Telephoto lens. Most people will be served well with the 12’s wide and ultra wide lenses and won’t miss the Telephoto. Being a big camera nerd, the Telephoto lens was one of the key reasons I opted for the Pro.
  • The 12 Pro also has a LiDAR scanner. I could care less about Augmented Reality applications, but the LiDAR scanner plays a big part in helping the 12 Pro cameras focus faster in low light.
  • The 12 Pro is reported to have 6GB of RAM vs 4GB for the 12. The extra RAM will mean more apps can stay open at a time, and you’ll see snappier results when switching from app to app.
  • And finally, the 12 Pro will have the ability (in a later software update) to shoot photos in Apple ProRAW. There’s really no technical reason why the 12 couldn’t do this as well, but Apple feels the need to lock certain features, even if they are software based, to justify the higher cost phone.
  • Color options. The Pro gets you graphite, silver, gold and Pacific Blue (which seems to be the most color judging from the stock outages). The iPhone 12 gets you White, Black, Blue, Green and (Product) Red. The blue is a brighter shade than the Pacific Blue, and is my favorite color out of all this years models. I really wish Apple had used this blue on the Pro. Keeping with last years differenatiation, the iPhone 12 back is glossy with the camera hump using a matte glass, and the 12 Pro back is frosted matte glass and the camera hump is glossy. The 12 Pro Stainless Steel frame is a fingerprint magnet.

So again, being the camera nerd that I am, I opted for the 12 Pro over the 12.

But I suspect that most people don’t care or wouldn’t use the telephoto lens all that often, and would be better server with the iPhone 12.

Cameras

So, if you’re considering the 12 pro over the regular 12, most likely it’s because of the telephoto camera, the (promised) ability to shoot RAW, and the addition of Dolby Vision HDR, a video format that captures more dynamic range (10 bit vs. 8 bit for regular video footage).

Dolby Vision footage does look nice, but be warned that you need a device capable of interpreting and outputting Dolby Vision to see it in action. The iPhone 12 Pro/12 Pro Max can playback video recording with Dolby Vision, and you can stream 4k Dolby Vision to AppleTV. But if you share your Dolby Vision footage to another iPhone user who doesn’t have a 12 Pro/12 Pro Max, they won’t see the increased dynamic range. And uploads to YouTube won’t retain that information either. So while it’s a nice feature, apart from making the footage you shoot look nicer on your phone, you won’t be able to share that improved footage beyond the iPhone 12 Pro phones. I’m sure as time goes on more and more devices will be able to handle Dolby Vision, and maybe even sites like YouTube will accommodate it. But for now, it’s a cool feature that has no real practical application.

MagSafe is reborn

Everyone laments the passing of MagSafe charging cables for the Mac laptops. MagSafe made the power adapter cable magnetically attach to your computer, which made plugging and unplugging a bit easier.

Apple has resurrected the MagSafe brand for the new charging system for the new iPhones. If you’ve used “wireless” chargers, you know their biggest problem is that if you don’t place the phone precisely in the right area, it will not charge. If you have your phone charging next to your bed and accidentally nudge it slightly, you could wake up with a phone that isn’t charged.

MagSafe solves this by using magnets to precisely place the charger in the correct spot on the back of the device. Apple is extending this magnetic attachment to cases and to accessories like the wallet attachment. I’m sure you’ll also see lots of the 3rd party accessories pop up in the future that take advantage of MagSafe. And who knows – maybe MagSafe will return to Macs in the future, or expand to iPads. It certainly fits in with Apple’s push to remove ports when possible.

The downside is there’s a very real possibility a future iPhone might do away with the Lightning Port in favor of all wireless connectivity and charging. I still think there’s plenty of applications beyond charging that require a physical cable, so I’m hopeful this doesn’t happen anytime soon.

Pros

  • 5G is here if you have access to it in your area
  • New “ceramic shield” glass looks to be much strong than prior glass
  • LiDAR helps low light focusing and allows for portrait mode in similar low light conditions.
  • Dolby Vision makes 10 bit video HDR recording possible, albeit with limited playback options.
  • MagSafe is wonderful, so long as it’s not a harbinger for a port less iPhone in the future.

Cons

  • No 90 or 120hz refresh rate displays
  • Battery life is slightly less than the 11 Pro, mostly due to 5G.
  • No more EarPods in the box
  • No more charging brick included in the box (now a $19 accessory)
  • Color options on the Pro are more staid than the iPhone 12 (subjective, I know).
  • Only the 12 Pro Max gets the full sensor shift OIS. 12 Pro Max also gets a ‘longer’ Telephoto lens (65mm vs. 52mm on the Pro).

Summary

The iPhone 12 is the better bargain. The more pocketable weight along with the ‘grippier’ feel of the phone makes it the better feeling phone for most people. However, if you use your iPhone as a content creation tool, and feel you need the telephoto lens and video/software improvements (like Dolby Vision and ProRAW), along with the increase in RAM, the 12 Pro is a great tool that won’t disappoint. Users on the X or Xs will see the most benefit in upgrading. If you already have an 11 Pro, there’s not a lot here for you to upgrade to. You are better off waiting for 2021, which will include all the features in the 12 Pro, and possibly 120hz refresh rates.

Categories
Apple Computers Software

Thoughts on Apple Silicon

WWDC has come and gone, and the rumors were largely true: Apple will begin a migration to its own CPUs (which Apple is currently just calling ‘Apple Silicon‘) sometime later this year. This move had been rumored for a few years now, so it came as a surprise to absolutely no one. Apple has long strived to control the entire widget, and with this move, it will remove Intel from the product matrix, giving Apple near total control over it’s Mac’s technological composition.

Now, Apple didn’t say anything about future Macs, apart from telling us they will use Apple Silicon. But if you watched enough technical presentations from WWDC, and paid attention to some of the details, there are some pretty obvious tells.

One of the biggest tells was Apple declaring in their keynote video that future Apple Silicon based Macs will be able to run iPhone and iPad apps directly. These apps will be available in the Mac App Store automatically, unless Developers check a box that will restrict them from appearing there. Now, many iPad apps have been gaining mouse/trackpad input support, so these apps running on an Apple Silicon Mac will probably perform as good on a Mac as they will on an iPad. But what about iPhone apps? These apps generally do not have input device support beyond touch. How will these apps function on a Mac?

Touchscreen Macs.

Apple has been saying for a decade that adding touch input to a Mac was a bad idea. But during that same time, Apple has brought mouse/trackpad/keyboard/pen input to the iPad, something it said was best controlled with touch. So all the while Apple has been claiming that the Mac with a touchscreen would be a terrible compromise, they were bringing the Mac-ness of using a keyboard/mouse/pen to the iPad. So it clearly thinks that an iPad with expanded input support beyond touch is now a good idea.

If you’ve used the macOS Big Sur beta, you’ve no doubt noticed some of the big changes to the user interface/experience. Much of the UI looks more like iPad OS now. Apple is pushing for the Macs icons to use the same ‘squircle’ shape that the iPad/iOS use. It’s made the menu bar’s top items more spaced out, as if to allow for a larger touch target. They’ve applied the same spacing to the menu bar icons as well. The modal save/don’t save/cancel dialogs now feature larger buttons, as if to accommodate fingers instead of mouse cursors.

Control Center in macOS Big Sur. It sure does look like a lot of these UI elements are optimized for touch, doesn’t it?

So basically, Apple has made numerous UI enhancements that all seem to drive towards one goal – better input with something as imprecise as a finger.

Now, maybe we won’t get touch support when the first Macs with Apple Silicon ship later this year. Nobody knows which Macs will go first, but if it is a Mac with a built in screen, there’s a strong likelihood that it will feature a touchscreen.

There’s one other observation I’d like to make. Just a few years ago, Craig Federighi said during a keynote that Apple was not merging iOS and macOS. Well, they may both remain distinct OSes particular to their own hardware, but Apple has definitely gone just about as far as merging them as you can go without actually merging them.

The Proof:

  • iPadOS 14 and macOS Big Sur share a common design language.
  • With Apple Silicon, you can now develop for both platforms in one app codebase, using SwiftUI.
  • You can easily bring your UIKit iPad app over to the Mac, thanks to the work of project Catalyst.

And if the above two scenarios don’t work for your iPad app scenario, you can just run the iPad app as-is on your Apple Silicon based Mac.

Now, there are still some major distinctions between the two platforms. For instance, the iPad still lacks a window manager. It is reliant on the App Store for installing new apps. The iPad security model is more restricted than the Macs. It doesn’t have legacy hardware support for the devices like the Mac does. There is still a feature chasm between the two platforms. But that chasm has grown considerably smaller. It’s small enough now that comparing the high end of the iPad (the iPad Pro), and the low end of the Mac (Macbook Air), can make choosing one of these devices for a particular task difficult. Once the Macbook Air/Pro can run all of the same software that you can run on an iPad, along with software that’s not restricted to the App Store, the chasm will be even smaller between the two platforms.

That sure does sound like the two products have merged to me.

Oh, and one final thought. The TouchBar is a goner. There was no mention of any improvements to the TouchBar API during WWDC. With touchscreen capability coming to future screen enabled Macs, the TouchBar becomes relegated to the long list of Apple technologies that never quite made sense.

Now, if we could just get Apple to add the AppleTV remote to that list.